Research departments

MOEMS


"MOEMS" TEAM : Microsystèmes Opto-électromécaniques

(Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems)


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Group leader

Christophe GORECKI

Context

Our MOEMS team brings together activities for the development of “Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems”. The MOEMS team is FEMTO-ST’s most important user of the MIMENTO center and its research is closely related to the center’s activities. The team is also involved in diverse crosscutting projects with several of FEMTO-ST’s departments (OPTICS, Time Frequency, AS2M, ENERGY).


Goals and Research Areas

The team’s research program is founded on the development of silicon/glass technologies for the design of complex components in three distinct areas:

› On-chip optical microscopes: in collaboration with the AS2M and OPTICS Departments, and via an original integration platform, the development of compact microscopes, broadly parallel with the development of basic technological components (micro-optic components, MOEMS scanners);

› Miniature atomic clock with alkali metal: development of miniature atomic clocks, based on microfabricated alkali vapor cells and on the principle of the coherent trapping of the atomic population. A project undertaken in collaboration with the Time-Frequency Department, an atomic clock such as this is characterized by its size of a few cm3 and a relative stability of 10-11 for one day of integration.

› Microsystems to recuperate thermal energy: this is also a transdisciplinary area, and a project pursued in collaboration with the ENERGY Department. This Stirling micromachine technology currently under development targets the saving and use of lost thermal energy, at low temperatures, in industrial processes.


Expertise

Techniques of collective micromachining, mainly silicon and glass, targeting the production of micro-optic components and mechanical microactuators. Monolithic fabrication or hybrid assembly, associated with multi-substrate incorporation, enables production of particularly complex microsystems.